Schools

GUNNISON


Narrow Gauge Railroad Exhibit at the Pioneer Museum

Narrow Gauge Railroad Exhibit at the Pioneer Museum

This exhibit consists of the Denver and Rio Grande railroad depot, steam locomotive No 268 and tender, a string of five rail cars, and the water-tank. These all relate to the narrow gauge railroad which dominated the Gunnison Country between 1881 and the 1950's when the tracks were removed. The Denver & Rio Grande steam locomotive number 268 operated extensively in the Gunnison area from the time it was built in 1882 until it was retired in 1955. It is one of only three still existing of its kind. The string of cars, all built between 1885 and 1903 were used by the D&RG in the Gunnison area.

The railroad station and water tank are excellent examples showing the design of railroad buildings and structures in the second half of the 19th century.

In addition to providing transportation to and from the outside world, the D&RG route through the Black Canyon to Cimarron was a popular tourist attraction. It also made moving cattle and sheep viable for the local ranchers.

Address: 803 E. Tomichi, Gunnison
Legal: part of Sec 1, T49N,R1W,NWPM
Current Use: Museum Exhibit
Contact: Pioneer Historical Society
Designated: July 5, 2000


Mountaineer Site

Mountaineer Site

The Mountaineer Site is an archaeological site with several significant components. First the site contains several Folsom occupations. These areas have yielded fragments of thirty distinctive Folsom projectile points which date between 10,000 and 11,000 years ago. This time is the end of the last great Ice Age. Folsom occupations are rare and especially so in western Colorado. A second important aspect of the Mountaineer Site is the alignments of stone cairns and pits. It is believed to be a sign of game drive systems. Finally there is an early Archaic occupation on the Mountaineer Site which is evidenced by large triangular side-notched projectile points. Research is continuing on this site by Western State College.

Address: Top of Tenderfoot Mountain
Legal: W2,Sec7,T48N,R1E,NMPM
Current Use: Radio Transmitters/Research
Contact: WSC
Designated: September 19, 2000


Smith Opera House

Smith Opera House

The Smith Opera House was constructed in 1882 by Frank C. Smith. It is typical of those constructed in mining towns of the 1880's. It demonstrates an eclectic style of architecture including the Greek symmetry of design evident in the straight lines, gabled windows with lintels and colonnades on the front of the building. The design overlaps with the Italianate bracketed roof overhang and arched lintels over the windows. The Victorian influence that dominated this period is accented through the floor plan which features a central staircase and long, broad rooms and hallways. Red brick was used in the construction of the building.

The building was constructed with commercial use in mind, perhaps retail and office space on the first floor. The second floor was opened as an Opera House in 1883. In 1884, failed economics doomed the opera house and the building was sold at a sheriff's sale. It was then converted to rooming house/apartments and was renamed the Grand Apartments. The building has been renovated and is now in use as offices.

Address: 114 North Boulevard Street Gunnison
Legal: Blk 13, Lots 1-8 W. Gunnison Addition
Current Use: Offices
Contact: Joe Puchek
Designated: October 5, 2000


Johnson Building

Johnson Building

The property on which the Johnson Building was built changed hands seven times in 1880 with the price fluctuating from $20 to $275. Then in 1881 the building was built on the property and Mary Thomas bought it for $250, immediately selling it for $800. Walker Burkett bought the building and the property in 1901, and when Effie Jane Lashbrook arrived in Gunnison with her sick husband and children in 1901, she took over the empty building. She turned the lower floor into a restaurant and made living quarters for her family upstairs and named the restaurant the Royal Café. Burnett leased the building to Sam and Anna Francis (Frankie) Johnson for their restaurant in 1904 and at that time, it became the Johnson Restaurant. Johnson's bought the building on October 20, 1920. Sam and Frankie (after Sam's death in 1923) continued the restaurant until Frankie died in 1942. Their daughter Sarah Trine and her husband Harry bought her brother's share. Sarah continued to operate the restaurant (summers only in later years) until 1985. In 1996, the Tredway family bought the Johnson Building from Sarah Trine. They have restored and renovated both floors of the building. The lower floor is now a Gallery where many of the original antiques are on display. The upper floors are offices.

Address: 122-124 N. Main Gunnison
Legal:
Current Use: Gallery/offices
Contact: Nancy Tredway
Designated:


Chance Gulch

Chance Gulch

The Chance Gulch Site is a highly significant archaeological site was first recorded about 1980. The site is a multi-component campsite with buried, stratified deposits that represent the Paleoindian through historic periods, circa 11,000 BP (years before present ) through 50 years BP. While archaeological remains of all of the encompassed periods of prehistory stand to yield vital new information about past human lifeways, the Chance Gulch site's particular and unique significance lies in its potential to teach us about the land use and subsistence strategies of occupants of the Rocky Mountains during this period. Presently, students at Western State College participate in research of the site.


Address: 2.5 miles SE of Gunnison
Legal: Parts of Sec 16 & 17,T49N,R1E,NMPM
Current Use: Grazing, Research
Contact: WSC/Bureau of Land Management
Designated: September 19, 2000


Aberdeen Quarry

Aberdeen Quarry

In March of 1888 the granite was discovered by F.G. Zugelder. It is said that he carried out the first sample of the granite on showshoes to be sent to Denver for testing as the potential building material for the Capital building. The granite from the Aberdeen Quarry was said to be of the finest and highest quality of its kind and therefore was selected for the State Capitol building. To transport the granite to Denver, the D&RG Railroad put in a spur to the quarry.

Aberdeen had a Post Office, a population of 149, and a school for four pupils. The quarry operated from August 1, 1889 to June 15, 1892. After the quarry closed, a few people continued to live at Aberdeen for a time. Today all that remains of the town is piles of weathered lumber on the ground where buildings once stood.

Owned for a number of years by Louis Borland and Bill Endner, both deeded the quarry to the Gunnison County Pioneer and Historical Society. Throughout the summer months jeep tours are scheduled to the Quarry by the Pioneer Museum.

Address: 14 miles SW of Gunnison
Legal: parts of Sec 4 & 5, T 48N, R1W
Current Use: Museum Tours
Contact: Gunnison Pioneer Museum
Date Designated: December 17, 1996


BACK TO HOME PAGE

 


©2006-2010 Gunnison County Historic Preservation Commission




Site built & maintained by Paragon Computers, Inc.